YSU FINANCIAL AID

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Title: Experience YSU
Author: City of Youngstown
Website: Resources

The following video and it’s transcription offers a virtual tour of Youngstown State University. In this video they highlight YSU for it’s beautiful campus and academic challenges that prepare students for real world success. Experience Y!

**The video transcribed on this page is from the City of Youngstown. The video is original and has not been altered from it’s original format. We do not claim ownership of this video or content, you can find the original source linked above. We have transcribed the video for the hearing impaired.

YOUNGSTOWN STATE UNIVERSITY, YOUNGSTOWN OH | EXPERIENCE YSU CAMPUS

00:00 Speaker 1: Youngstown State University, located in northeast Ohio, continues to create business and community partnerships that allow our students real world experience and the opportunity to transform the region and the world. The university has six colleges, offering a vast variety of academically rewarding programs and internships that challenge and prepare students for professional and personal success. With advanced research facilities, personalized attention in the classroom, and countless activities all on a beautiful vibrant campus, it’s easy to see what makes Youngstown State University a great choice for your future. Welcome to our campus, and let us show you why you should experience Y.

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Title: How To Apply | FAFSA, Free Application Federal Student Aid
Author: Federal Student Aid
Website: Resources

The video on this website and it’s transcription by, Federal Student Aid explains how to fill out and complete the FAFSA. This is the first step to receiving federal student aid such as loans, grants and scholarship you may be eligible for while attending Youngstown State University. This is a general video and not specified directly to YSU. Any questions about the FAFSA or your financial aid should be directed to the YSU admin office. We hope this video help.

**This video transcribed on this page is from the Federal Student Aid website. The video is original and has not been altered from it’s original format. We do not claim ownership of this video or content. You can find the original source linked above. We have transcribed the video for the hearing impaired.

HOW TO APPLY | FAFSA, FREE APPLICATION FEDERAL STUDENT AID

00:00 Speaker 1: The Free Application for Federal Student Aid or FAFSA, is the application for grants, loans, and work study funds provided by the Federal Government. It is also used by many states and schools for their financial aid programs. For the fastest and easiest way to apply, visit our official website, fafsa.gov. The FAFSA is available in English and Spanish. As you fill it out online, you’ll be able to automatically skip questions that don’t pertain to you, check out your status immediately, and get online help. It takes most people less than 30 minutes to complete the application. You’ll need a few things when you fill it out so get ready by gathering your social security number, your permanent resident card, if you have one, any W2 forms or records of money you earned for the previous year, and your tax records.

00:49 Speaker 1: By the way, a nice timesaving feature of the FAFSA, is that many people are eligible to automatically transfer their tax data from the IRS into the FAFSA. So keep an eye out while you’re applying in case you’re offered that option. If you have any questions about what information to gather, there’s a complete list of documents that you will need at fafsa.gov. Before you begin the process of filling out the FAFSA, you should create a username and password called an FSA ID that will act as your electronic signature. You’ll only need to create a FSA ID once and you can use it to renew your FAFSA each year that you apply. Your parents will need an FSA ID too if they have to provide any information.

01:32 Speaker 1: So now you’re ready to begin filling out the FAFSA to apply for financial aid.There are three groups of questions that include personal information such as your name, address, and marital status, financial information such as your income, and any parent information that is required. If you get hung up or confused about a question, the help and hints box on the right hand side of the application can help with each question as you move along. Also, look for the online chat feature under Help, if you would like assistance from a knowledgeable agent.

02:03 Speaker 1: Because colleges and career schools use the FAFSA to provide financial aid, you can list up to 10 schools that you are interested in attending. You should list all the schools that you are considering, even if you haven’t been accepted or applied yet. If you have more then 10 schools in mind, you can submit your FAFSA with 10 schools and then replace some of those schools with other schools later. When you finish filling out the FAFSA, use your FSA ID to sign the form. If you are required to submit parent information on your FAFSA, a parent will need to sign the application with his or her own FSA ID as well. If you have any questions or need more information, please visit studentaid.gov.

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Title: Dependency Status | FAFSA, Free Application Federal Student Aid
Author: Federal Student Aid
Website: Resources

This video and it’s transcription by, Federal Student Aid explains if you will be an independent student or an dependent student. They go will through a series of questions to determine your status. All questions about your dependency status should be directed to the YSU Financial Aid Office.

**This video transcribed on this page is from the Federal Student Aid website. The video is original and has not been altered from it’s original format. We do not claim ownership of this video or content. You can find the original source linked above. We have transcribed the video for the hearing Impaired.

DEPENDENCY STATUS | FAFSA, FREE APPLICATION FEDERAL STUDENT AID

00:00 Speaker: When you fill out the FAFSA, you’ll be asked several questions that will determine whether you are an independent or dependent student. This is an important distinction, because if you’re a dependent student, then you’ll need to include your parents’ financial information on your FAFSA. This means that your parents’ financial information will be considered along with your information to determine your eligibility for federal student aid. So how do you figure out if you’re an independent or dependent student? Generally, if you are a graduate student, on active duty in the US Armed Forces, a veteran, are married, have children whom you support, or are 24 or older, then you are considered an independent student. If you don’t meet any of these criteria, then you’re likely considered a dependent student and will have to provide your parents’ financial information when completing the FAFSA.

00:53 Speaker: If you have a different living situation, including divorced parents or living under the care of a grandparent or other relative, the online FAFSA will provide guidance to help you answer the parent questions. In other special circumstances, your status may not be as easy to determine and you’ll need guidance from the financial aid office at the college or career school you plan to attend. Some common questions that people often ask are: What if the FAFSA tells me I’m a dependent student, but my parents don’t claim me on their taxes or I’ve moved out of their house and I’m financially independent? While these situations do arise, they aren’t part of the criteria for independent status on the FAFSA, so you would still be required to report your parents’ financial information on the FAFSA.

01:38 Speaker: What if I’m considered a dependent student, but I have no contact with my parents or access to their information? There are other options available to you in these situations. So it is possible for a dependent student to submit the FAFSA without parental information. If you have indicated on your FAFSA that you cannot contact your parents or access their financial information, you’ll need to speak to staff at the financial aid office at the college or career school you plan to attend. The financial aid staff will tell you what to do next.

02:09 Speaker: So what if my parents aren’t going to help me pay for college and refuse to provide information for my FAFSA? If this is the case, the only federal aid you may be able to receive will be an unsubsidized loan, which is a federal student loan that begins accruing interest as soon as you receive your funds. To find out whether you can get the loan, fill out your FAFSA and then speak to the financial aid staff at the college or career school that you wish to attend.

02:34 Speaker: If you have any other questions regarding financial aid, your college or career school will be able to answer them for you, and if appropriate, make a decision about your dependency status. Their decision is final and cannot be appealed to the US Department of Education. No matter your dependency status, make sure to complete the FAFSA to find out what federal money you can get for college or career school. If you have questions or need more information, please visit studentaid.gov.

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Title: How to Create A FSA ID | FAFSA, Free Application Federal Student Aid

Author: Federal Student Aid
Website: Resources

This video on how to create a FSA ID and it’s transcription by, Federal Student Aid explains how to create a FSA ID step by step. They provide screen shots in the video and explain the process from beginning to end and how it allows you to access all student loan websites. If you should have additional questions about creating your FSA ID, please contact the Youngstown State Financial Aid Office.

**This video transcribed on this page is from the Federal Student Aid website. The video is original and has not been altered from it’s original format. We do not claim ownership of this video or content. You can find the original source linked above. We have transcribed the video for the hearing impaired.

HOW TO CREATE A FSA ID | FAFSA, FREE APPLICATION FEDERAL STUDENT AID

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00:08 Speaker: The FSA ID is a username and password that you will need to access US Department of Education websites such as fafsa.gov or studentloans.gov. You will use your FSA ID every year you apply for federal student aid and while you are repaying any student loans you received. It is very important that you create your own FSA ID. Don’t let anyone else create your FSA ID for you. The FSA ID is a legal signature that should be created and used only by the owner. And allowing someone else to create your FSA ID, could cause problems with your financial aid.

00:48 Speaker: To get started, go to studentaid.gov/fsaid. Click ‘Create an FSA ID’. Make sure to read the instructions at the top of each page. Also, if you aren’t sure how to answer a question, you can get additional information by clicking the gray question mark next to each question. We recommend that you provide your email address when you create your FSA ID. An email address isn’t required, but if you provide one, you can use it to retrieve your username and password if you forget them. Make sure to use an email address that you can access. The email address you choose can’t be used with anyone else’s FSA ID. For example, if a parent and a child share the same email address, they cannot both use that email address when creating their own FSA IDs. One person will need to use a different email address.

01:45 Speaker: Next, create a username that is at least six characters long and that is easy for you to remember. If you see a message saying ‘Username taken. Create a different username’, then someone else has already used that username, and you will need to use a different name. One way to create a unique username is to add a number to the end of the name. You will also need to create a password. Make sure you don’t include personal information such as your name, date of birth, or social security number in your password. Do not give your username and password to anyone.

02:20 Speaker: Lastly, verify your age and click ‘Continue’. Provide your social security number, date of birth and full name. The information must match exactly what’s on your social security card. Make sure to put your first and last name in the correct spots, and double check that you haven’t made any typos. You must have a social security number to create an FSA ID. Once you click ‘Continue’, you’ll go to the profile page. If you had a federal student aid pin, you can enter it now. If you forgot your fourdigit pin, click ‘Forgot my pin’, and you can answer your pin challenge question, instead. By providing your pin, you are confirming your identity, and you will be able to use your FSA ID right away to access all US Department of Education websites that require it. If you never had a pin or forgot it, don’t worry. You can still create your FSA ID and use it to sign and submit a new FAFSA immediately. But it will take one to three days for your information to be confirmed with the Social Security Administration. Until your information is verified, you won’t be able to take certain actions such as correct your FAFSA, submit a renewal FAFSA, sign your Master Promissory Note or access your loan history online. On the profile page, enter your mailing address and telephone number. You can also choose to receive FSA ID information in Spanish by selecting the language preference.

03:52 Speaker: Next, create your challenge questions. These are questions we’ll ask you if you forget your username and password or lock your account. For the first two challenge questions, pick a question from the drop down box and enter your answer. Select the ‘Show text’ box, so you can see what you’re typing. For challenge questions number three and four, type your own question and answer. Maybe something like, “What street did I grow up on?”, “Who is my favorite aunt?”, or “What is my favorite food?”

04:23 Speaker: Finally, for challenge question number five, pick a significant date from your life other than your birthday. This number is used if you need to access your loan history through automated phone systems. It’s important that you pick questions and answers that you’ll be able to remember. Click ‘Continue’ to review all the information you’ve entered so far. Double check all of the information you’ve provided, especially your email address if you entered one and your social security number, name and date of birth. If you need to make a correction, select the ‘Previous’ button to go back to the correct screen and make your changes.

05:00 Speaker: Then, read the terms and conditions, click the check box to accept them and click continue. If you entered your email address, we’ll send you an email with a secure code. You’ll need to enter your secure code on the email verification page. Do not close the email verification page. If you haven’t already, log into your email account using a different tab, browser window or another device. Look for an email with the subject line, “Important. Your FSA ID Email Validation. Action Required”, from FSA ID Information. If you haven’t received the email within a few minutes, check your junk mail folder. Enter the sixdigit numeric code from the email message into the box on the FSA ID email verification page and click ‘Continue’. Congratulations! You’ll see a screen confirming you successfully created your FSA ID. If you provided an email address, you will also receive a confirmation email. You can now complete, sign and submit your new FAFSA. For more information about the FSA ID, including when and where you can use it, go to studentaid.gov/fsaid.

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Title: Helpul Financial Aid Tips For Parents | FSA ID, FAFSA, Free Application Federal Student Aid
Author: Federal Student Aid
Website: Resources

This video and it’s transcription gives parents of dependent students helpful FAFSA and FSA ID tips. The video is directed towards parents not students. Please contact the YSU FInancial Aid Office if you should have additional questions.

**This video transcribed on this page is from the Federal Student Aid website. The video is original and has not been altered from it’s original format. We do not claim ownership of this video or content. You can find the original source linked above. We have transcribed the video for the hearing impaired.

TIPS FOR PARENTS | FSA ID, FAFSA, FREE APPLICATION FEDERAL STUDENT AID

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00:08 Speaker: It’s time for your child to complete the free application for Federal Student Aid or FAFSA. The FAFSA is the students’ application. But if your child is considered dependent, you will have to provide some information, and sign it as well. If you aren’t sure if your child is considered a dependent student for the FAFSA, go to studentaid.gov/dependency to learn more. Before starting the FAFSA, get an FSA ID. Your child will need an FSA ID to sign the FAFSA electronically, and to make any corrections later. An FSA ID is a username and password that is used to log on to certain US Department of Education websites. If your child is providing parental information on the FAFSA, you will need to sign the FAFSA, too. If you have a Social Security number, you can get your own FSA ID to sign the FAFSA online.

01:08 Speaker: Before starting the FAFSA, you and your child should go to studentaid.gov/fsaid to create your own FSA ID. There’s a lot of helpful information about creating and using your FSA ID on that website. It’s very important that you and your child each create your own FSA ID to prevent problems or delays with your child’s financial aid.

01:35 Speaker: Starting a FAFSA. The login page. To start a new application, go to fafsa.gov, and click the ‘Start a New FAFSA’ button. If your child is starting the application, he or she can enter his or her FSA ID on the left side of the login page. If you are starting your child’s FAFSA, then select ‘Enter the Student’s Information’, on the right to begin. Don’t enter your child’s FSA ID, or your FSA ID on this page. Follow the instructions on the screen to proceed.

02:14 Speaker: Starting a FAFSA. Making a save key. Next, you’ll be asked to create a save key.The save key is a temporary password that lets you save the FAFSA, then you can return to the application later to complete it or share the FAFSA with someone else. The save key lets you and your child work on the FAFSA together, even if you aren’t in the same location. One of you can start a FAFSA. Click the save button at the bottom of the page, and then exit. Then the other person can log in at fafsa.gov using the student’s identifiers and the save key, and pick up where the other person left off. Once you create your save key, make a note of it. Unlike the FSA ID, the save key is meant to be shared between you and your child. Now you can begin completing the FAFSA. Help is available for every question. Look for the help and hints box on the right side of the screen.

03:21 Speaker: Signing the FAFSA. After you and your child have filled out the FAFSA, you will both need to sign it. If you are in the same location, you can each enter your own username and password on the sign and submit page. The student’s signature is on top, and the parents’ signature is below. Make sure you each put your information in the correct spot. If you and your child are not together, one of you can sign the application by entering your username and password, and clicking the sign button, then save and close the application. The other can then log in at fafsa.gov using the save key, and sign the application. Each person should enter his or her own username and password in the correct spot, student above, and parent below.

04:14 Speaker: If you are a parent without a Social Security number, you will not be able to get an FSA ID, and will not be able to sign the FAFSA electronically. Instead, your child will submit the FAFSA without a parent’s signature, and then print a paper signature page for you to sign and return by mail. Follow the instructions on the screen.

04:36 Speaker: Submitting the FAFSA. Once you and your child have signed the FAFSA using your own FSA IDs, submit it by clicking the blue ‘Submit My FAFSA Now’ button at the bottom of the page. Your child’s FAFSA is not submitted, until you see the confirmation page. You may wanna print the confirmation page for your records. Your child will receive a copy of the
confirmation page by email, if he or she provided an email address. Congratulations! Your child’s FAFSA is submitted. Now it will take three to five days to process, and then it will be made available to the financial aid offices of the schools listed on the FAFSA. They will use the information to determine what aid your child may be eligible to receive.

05:26 Speaker: If you have other children applying for financial aid this year, there’s a time saving link on the confirmation page. At the top of the page it will say ‘Optional Feature’, ‘Transfer your parents’ information into another FAFSA’. Click here, and you can start a new FAFSA for another child, and much of your information will be carried over into the new FAFSA. If you have questions or need more information, please visit studentaid.gov/fafsa.

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Title: Financial Aid Process Overview | FAFSA, Free Application Federal Student Aid
Author: Federal Student Aid
Website: Resources

The following video and it’s transcription offers an overview of the financial aid process. It goes through the FAFSA process and the seriousness of borrowing federal student loans. The video also touches on how to be responsible with loans from the Department of Education.

**This video transcribed on this page is from the Federal Student Aid website. The video is original and has not been altered from it’s original format. We do not claim ownership of this video or content. You can find the original source linked above. We have transcribed the video for the hearing impaired.

FINANCIAL AID PROCESS OVERVIEW | FAFSA, FREE APPLICATION FEDERAL STUDENT AID

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00:00 Speaker: So you wanna go to college or career school. Maybe you started saving early, maybe you’ll discover some buried treasure, but more likely, you’ll need another plan. So if paying for college is going to fall on your shoulders, the US Department of Education’s Office of Federal Student Aid is the best place to turn for assistance.

00:19 Speaker: I bet you didn’t know that we’re the largest provider of grants, loans, and work study funds, all of which are easy to apply for. And when it is time to apply for aid, head to your favorite spot to complete the free application for Federal Student Aid or FAFSA. Each October, a new FAFSA is available for the next school year, and completing it is free when you go to the official website fafsa.gov.

00:43 Speaker: Your selected colleges will use the information on your FAFSA to figure out how much aid you’ll get, so make sure your info is accurate, but if you need to, you can go back and make some changes.

00:55 Speaker: If you get a grant or work study job, congrats, you won’t have to pay the money back. However, a federal loan is borrowed money, and you’ll need to promise to repay it. Remember to borrow only what you need, because a federal student loan is a real loan. Just like with a car or home loan, it’s important that you understand what you’re agreeing to.

01:13 Speaker: Although college financial aid and the prospect of an instant noodle diet can be a little overwhelming, you’ll be putting yourself on the path to success when you take the time to plan out your options, and let the Office of Federal Student Aid help you along the way. If you have questions or need more information, please visit studentaid.gov.

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Title: FAFSA Overview | FAFSA, Free Application Federal Student Aid
Author: Federal Student Aid
Website: Resources

The following video and it’s transcription offers an detailed overview of the FAFSA. It touches on where it can completed, and we also included the link for you as well. Please contact the Youngstown State University admissions office if you should have any additional questions.

**This video transcribed on this page is from the Federal Student Aid website. The video is original and has not been altered from it’s original format. We do not claim ownership of this video or content. You can find the original source linked above. We have transcribed the video for the hearing impaired.

FAFSA OVERVIEW | FAFSA, FREE APPLICATION FEDERAL STUDENT AID

00:00 Speaker: If you’re interested in financial aid for college or career school, you’re going to need to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA. It takes most people about 30 minutes to complete online, and the best part, it’s 100% free. And it provides you with access to grants, loans, and work study funds from the federal government, and many colleges and states use FAFSA information to provide their own college or state financial aid.

00:26 Speaker: Before you fill out the FAFSA, it’s a good idea to create your FSA ID, a username and password that lets you electronically sign your FAFSA and gives you access to various websites related to federal student aid. And here’s an important tip, if your parent is providing information on your FAFSA, he or she will need his or her own FSA ID. Visit studentaid.gov/fsaid for more information.

00:51 Speaker: Your FAFSA can be completed online at fafsa.gov, and help is provided throughout the online application process. You will need to fill out the FAFSA each year you’re in school, because your financial situation may change. Plus, you may be able to automatically transfer your tax data from the IRS, making the application even quicker to fill out. Each state and college or career school sets its own deadline for the FAFSA, so it’s best to get it done early. Since some of the funds are available on a first come, first served basis, you don’t want to miss out.

01:25 Speaker: Now that you know about the FAFSA, you might be asking, “Well, how much money will I get?” Your college or career school will do the math, and there’s a simple formula that they use. First, the college takes your cost of attendance which is the total amount it will cost you to go to that school. Your cost of attendance will vary from school to school. Then, the college subtracts your Expected Family Contribution, or EFC. Your EFC is based on information provided in you FAFSA and will not change based on the school you attend. However, the EFC is not necessarily the amount of money you will have to pay. Basically, your cost of attendance minus your EFC equals your financial need. Your college uses your financial need and other information to determine how much financial aid you can receive.

02:09 Speaker: See? Pretty simple. If you have questions or need more information, please visit studentaid.gov.

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Title: What Happens Next | FAFSA, Free Application Federal Student Aid
Author: Federal Student Aid
Website: Resources

This video and it’s transcription covers what happens after you complete the FAFSA. They go over important terms like, “SAR” and where you can check its processing status. Please contact the YSU Financial Aid Office if you should have any questions about your FAFSA status. We hope these videos helped.

**This video transcribed on this page is from the Federal Student Aid website. The video is original and has not been altered from it’s original format. We do not claim ownership of this video or content. You can find the original source linked above. We have transcribed the video for the hearing impaired.

WHAT HAPPENS NEXT | FAFSA, FREE APPLICATION FEDERAL STUDENT AID

00:00 Speaker 1: So, you filled out the FAFSA. Now what? The information you submitted will be processed by the US Department of Educations Office of Federal Student Aid and the colleges or career schools you listed will be notified so they can begin their process of awarding aid. The great thing about filling out the FAFSA online is that you can check its processing status immediately. This comes in handy when you’re thinking, “I wonder if it went through”. Within a few days of filling out the FAFSA, you’ll get your Student Aid Report or SAR. You’ll hear that abbreviation again so just remember, your SAR is your Student Aid Report. Basically, it summarizes all of the information you submitted on the FAFSA. You can access your SAR online at fafsa.gov using your FSA ID, which is your username and password. Check your SAR for any mistakes, then make corrections if you need to, but only if you estimated your tax information or provided incorrect information the day you filled out the FAFSA. On your SAR, you’ll see reference to your EFC or Expected Family Contribution. This number is used to determine your eligibility for federal student aid. It doesn’t mean you actually have to contribute that amount.

01:13 Speaker 1: The financial aid office at each college or career school you list on your FAFSA will receive your information. Each office will then use your FAFSA information to determine how much aid you can get at that school. It’s possible that your college or career school may require you to verify the information you submitted on your FAFSA. If that happens, your school will tell you what you need to do. Once you’re accepted into a college or career school, you’ll get an award letter from the school’s financial aid office that explains the aid being offered to you. We’d recommend comparing award letters from multiple schools. That way, you can make the best decision for your situation. If you have any questions about your financial aid offer, contact the school’s financial aid office.

01:57 Speaker 1: If your aid offer includes a federal loan and you’re a first time borrower, there are a few more steps before you get your loan. You’ll need to complete entrance counseling and sign the Master Promissory Note or MPN, which is your agreement to pay back the loan. Your school will provide you with the necessary information. So how do you get your money? Well, usually, your grants and loans will be applied to tuition fees and other charges on your student account first, then any leftover money is paid to you. Work study funds are earned throughout the term. Remember, filling out the FAFSA is not a onetime thing. You must complete it every year you attend school. If you have questions or need more information, please visit studentaid.gov.

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